SonaliMcDermid

Sonali McDermid, Assistant Professor

Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science and Climatology (2011); M. Phil in Atmospheric Science (2011); M.A. in Earth and Environmental Science from Columbia University (2009); B.A. in Physics from New York University (2006).Office Address: 285 Mercer Street, 10th Floor New York, NY 10003
Email: sps246@nyu.edu
Phone: 212-992-7469
Fax: 212-995-4157
Personal Homepage

Areas of Research/Interest:
Understanding interactions between climate change and variability, land-use, and agriculture, with an eye towards identifying and quantifying important feedbacks and uncertainties.

Bio:
Sonali McDermid is Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies. She holds a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science and Climatology (2011), an M. Phil in Atmospheric Science (2011) and M.A. in Earth and Environmental Science from Columbia University (2009). She holds a B.A. in Physics from NYU (2006). McDermid’s research focuses on understanding interactions between climate change and variability, land-use, and agriculture, with an eye towards identifying and quantifying important feedbacks and uncertainties. She uses a variety of tools and datasets, including observed and remote-sensing datasets, global climate models, and process-based crop models. She has undertaken a number of climate-agroecosystem assessments, with an emphasis on identifying metrics of system health and resilience in the face of climate change and variability, and socio-economic shocks. Previously, McDermid was a NASA Post-Doctoral researcher at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York City, and conducted much of her work through the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (www.agmip.org), which is conducting integrated assessments of climate change and food security in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. She continues her work with AgMIP, and also uses the NASA GISS global climate model to undertake investigations of global and regional climate-land surface interactions, and the impact of climate change and altered sea surface temperatures on the South Asian Summer Monsoon system. Her work has appeared in Climate Dynamics, Paleoceanography, and Global Change Biology, and she presents annually at major conferences, such as the American Geophysical Union Fall meeting.